Archive | June, 2015

Confessional Hit Men

23 Jun

St. Augustine is said to have prayed “Lord, make me pure, but not yet!” John Perkins, author of Confessions of an Economic Hit Man would likely relate to that statement; there seems to be quite a gap between his realization that his professional life is an amoral one and his abandonment of that life.

We didn’t know anything about Perkins before we read this book, and from what we gather, his other work is about the teachings of shamans he met in South America. Perkins seems to be sort of a latter-day Carlos Castenada without the drugs. In Confessions, Perkins explains that an economic hit man (EHM) is one who travels to Indonesia, or Panama, or wherever and persuades officials of that country to accept development projects with inflated growth projections. The terms of the contract stipulate that American firms do the work, so the boys from Bechtel or Halliburton, or Perkins’ (now defunct) employer Chas. T. Main come in and make lots of money. If the debtor county struggles under the weight of the debt that they’re saddled with, no problem – the creditor nation (the US) can trade that for favorable United Nations votes, or access to the debtor’s natural resources, or to force the nation to allow American military bases.

Perkins seems to be a love-him-or-hate-him kind of guy (or in Greg Palast’s assessment, a guy that you hate then come to love http://www.gregpalast.com/john-perkins-jerk-con-man-shill/).  Some think him a complete nut job who made up everything in the book while others laud him for mending his ways and telling it like it is.

As per usual, we’re on the fence.  We don’t quite know what to make of Perkins’ tale of being brought into the shadowy EHM world by an attractive woman named Claudine Martin, who then vanishes without a trace.  This story seems far-fetched, but to us, its not the main point of the book, so we don’t ultimately care how he got into the biz. What strikes us are the parts of the book that don’t seem far-fetched. Call us conspiracy freaks if you wish, but  Perkins’ accounts of ‘corporatocracy’,  collusion between the US government and corporate interests in various places around the globe don’t seem all that hard to believe.  (Given the CIA’s involvement in the overthrow of Mossadegh in Iran and Allende in Chile, to name just two examples, many of the book’s assertions seem quite plausible.)

We’re not sorry we read the book, but it’s not as substantial as we had hoped.  Perkins also shades the truth at times to make himself appear in a better light.  After he leaves the EHM life, he lands a lucrative position as an expert witness for a nuclear power company.  He writes: “Unfortunately, the longer I studied the issue, the more I began to doubt the validity of my own arguments.  The literature was constantly changing at that time, reflecting a growth in research, and the evidence increasingly indicated that many alternative forms of energy were technically superior and more economical than nuclear power.” Perkins doesn’t state the exact time frame, but this seems to be in the early 80s.  The near-meltdown at Three Mile Island occurred in 1979, making this claim seem a mite disingenuous.

Abraham Lincoln is said to have (but probably didn’t)  opined “People who like this sort of thing will find this the sort of thing that they like.”  That reflects our feelings.  We generally liked the book, but many who suspect Perkins of being an unreliable narrator have a valid point.

silhouette of a man

Confess, hit man!