Tag Archives: Ted Chiang

Arrivals and Fast Runners

29 Nov

Moviedom has a lot of stock characters – the debonair spy, the macho soldier, and the female linguist to name a few.  Wait, the female linguist – is that a thing?   It is now – the movie is Arrival based on Ted Chiang’s The Story of Your Life and we found it amazing that the picture got made at all.  This is a movie with lots of ideas, and it doesn’t treat the audience as if they were idiots.  That’s a recipe for box office poison, right?  We don’t think so;  we first tried to see the film the day after Thanksgiving, only to find the show sold out.  (We came back the next day.)

Amy Adams is Louise Banks, who’s recruited by the US to figure out a way to communicate with some aliens after a whole bunch of space ships appear at various sites around the globe.  Louise is befriended by Ian Donnelly (Jeremy Renner) a physicist who’s also trying to figure out how to communicate with the new kids in town.

The heptapods (the aliens) are non-humanoid and their spoken language cannot be rendered by the human larynx.  A better avenue is offered by their written language, Heptapod B, which is unrelated to the spoken language.  It’s as if sentences were shapes, and you had to know how you were going to end a sentence when you started writing it, or at least that’s how we understood it.

The film (not so much Chiang’s story) amps up the tension, stressing the fear and xenophobia that comes with the arrival of the heptapods.  China becomes bellicose, with the Russians and the US not far behind. Intercut throughout the film are scenes of Louise and her daughter, the significance of which is revealed later on in the story.

As per usual, we find ourselves reluctant to reveal much else – the fun of watching a movie is diminished if some loudmouth like us tells you everything that’s going to happen. This is the holiday season, with lots of movies coming out over the next several weeks. This one is worth your time.

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There goes the neighborhood

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We’ve always wondered what it would be like to watch a movie about native people with no white people in it.  After all, Westerns that feature Indians are always about the interactions between the two groups, mostly told from the vantage point of the whites.  What if there were only native people in the film?

The Fast Runner (available on video – your library may have a copy) answers this question by retelling an Inuit folk tale.  So what is it like to watch a film about native people that’s not about their encounters with Europeans?  The answer is, really cool. The film is so intriguing that we plan to watch it again just to get the nuances we missed on the first viewing.

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